How the world has changed due to COVID-19

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“During a crisis, change is driven by pain and the austerity that stems from it”

The global pandemic of COVID-19 is creating havoc amongst the worldwide population and has led to enormous changes in the lives of people. With millions of people affected, an enormous disturbance has erupted amidst the existence and survival of mankind. As important it is to accommodate the changes this pandemic brings with itself, it is even more crucial to recognize the silver lining amidst the dark clouds of crisis.

Until today, it is not discernible that this pandemic is not the only hassle that India has faced as a country. To take a step back and reorient our focus towards the adversities that have occurred in the early 1990s, for example, the Mandal agitation, the Bombay riots, and the Latur earthquake, it was evident that the country was in dire need of a better socio-economic model along with a scope of developing more efficient ways of dealing with emergencies. These adversities were responsible for culminating an existential crisis for the major metropolitan cities and left the citizens in absolute shock. The very roots of our education policy that implies new opportunities and avenues for students were shaken to the core and the standards and timelines seemed obscure to most of the youth. The struggle, whether it rose from man-made reasons or natural calamities, insinuated that the country does not have viable economic and administrative units.

The only difference between these past disturbances and the current pandemic situation is the magnitude of people it is affecting regularly. This has led to the genesis of confusion and disparate opinions about the impact it will have in the future. It is indeed important to think about the future, as well as to look for options to facilitate the same. It is important to think about how the social enterprises joined hands for relief work when the plight of the pandemic started worsening. There were investors, both individuals, and clusters of them, who were benevolent towards these causes, along with the staff that volunteers on the basic level, who selflessly worked for people without agonizing about consequences. The preliminary thought about requiring a future fuelled several groups of people to create platforms that are capable of reimagining job roles and livelihoods.

Decoding Reverse Migration:

The subject of reverse migration raises different questions about the decentralization of economic zones and the viability of economic units as per the existing metric system. There are approximately 100 prevailing economic units, which consist of about 35–40 cities and numerous special economic zones (SEZs), and reverse migration has unsettled this baseline, which leads us to re-evaluate the feasibility of channelizing these zones into villages while keeping the social, economic and environmental paradigms intact. However, on a more realistic stance, it is easier to re-center these zones into towns that house a moderate population. In this way, there is an expectation of fulfilling the goals of reimagining livelihoods in an economic model that is re-designed accordingly. The current model of the economy relies on a physical space that ultimately governs the social transformation, and thereby facilitates the migration of people in search of a means to earn their daily bread.

“Life is simple if we can decode it in a manner that is implementable”

In this context, it makes us form an idea about the fundamental requirements for the paradigm shift in developing these areas. The hierarchical breakdown of resources may assist in the establishment of economic expansion, for example, the obvious requirement of essentials such as water, food, electricity, healthcare, education systems, and a skilled workforce. The re-assessment of these amenities leads us to find the glimmer of hope amidst the pain of reverse migration. Every commodity listed above is now being viewed in a different light along with deciphering the fundamental components that make the availability seem simple.

“A lot of people have been realizing that these changes are a must, it is no longer something that we can come back to later, and therefore, there is a need to decode this situation.”

Establishing the New Normal:

With scabs forming over previous wounds of adversities, the youth of today along with the development sector needs to reconsider the options of adopting new solutions for the community. We can define how the work of an individual is a clear definition of oneself, and that the solutions should stem from the job opportunities that can be created for people.

“Based on pay-scales and skillsets, the lower the society values the skillset, the higher the impact of the lockdown on people.”

Consequently, it is the responsibility of social enterprises to minimize the impact of the lockdown or any other crisis that the new normal brings with itself. A migrant, in a broader sense, has now lost the mobility which was essentially driving the growth of the economy. With the relinquishment of this driving force, the incentive must be steered towards more forthcoming avenues, such as the healthcare infrastructure since most of the uncertainty revolves around this criterion.

“This pandemic has taught us to introspect and to believe in the power of change, and also the fact that bringing about that change is our responsibility to those who suffered, to develop more inclusive job profiles.”

The amalgamation of business and charity can aid people to reiterate their way of living, where they can earn as well as receive help, whilst keeping their self-respect intact. With the current scenario in perspective, it cannot be inferred that the migration of people to cities will stop completely, but it does depict a certain amount of restrictions and apprehensions amongst themselves. This should suggest that new opportunities should be carved for people such as they do not lose their skillset, as well as uphold their economic integrity. Undeniably, life happens, but it is eventually about how we realign ourselves to the alterations these events bring with them.

Major organizations have directed their focus towards redefining jobs to workers and providing “cloud social security”, which can lead to the formulation of a more inclusive health insurance or savings plan. Multiple models and collaboration can assist in the development of the same. Unconventional education models, which can often be viewed as divisive in its manner, make the impression of continuous learning only accessible through technology for most people, and this very outlook needs urgent modification. The only hope that we can ascertain is the ability to change in all these standardized models and the faith in redesigning the next decade.

Key impressions:

  1. Breakdown of the concept of re-establishing developmental models.
  2. Adapting to the new standards of safety and living.
  3. Creating a secure environment for developing economic zones.

Written by: Shreya Roy

Metta Social solutions Pvt Ltd

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Donate to the Digital Daana campaign which is a mission to bridge the digital divide in education :

https://www.digitaldaana.org/ (Currently for Indian donors only)


How the world has changed due to COVID-19 was originally published in Metta Social on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Digital Daana

On a mission to enable access to digital education for 1 million children by 2023!

An initiative to enable global Indian Community to help & support underprivileged children in India!

Short story:

Little hands parted the curtains of the small window, quietly sneaking a look at the road and quickly scurried inside. Pia and her brother were trying to find the “corona monster” that has terrorised everyone in their neighbourhood. It was in March when the school had dismissed all of them and advised them to stay at home. The sun was scorching, as Pia walked back home with her brother, thinking about all the questions she had for her teacher. Why does it rain? Who paints the rainbow? Why is the sky blue? How many numbers do we learn? So many questions!

It feels like ages ago since Pia had been to school, studied, or played with her friends in the playground. She still learned her old lessons and wished to read more. She had heard from an aunt nearby that the school can reopen if everyone had a laptop or smartphone. She asked her Baba if they would get one too, even agreed to share it with her brother. To her dismay, Baba had no answer- they could barely make ends meet in these trying times. The “corona monster” had ruined school for her.

The coronavirus pandemic has rendered nearly 16 lakh children from low-income families like Pia, to struggle with the paucity of digital devices to access basic education through online classes. According to a survey conducted by NCERT, Delhi, approximately 27% of students do not have access to smartphones or laptops to attend online classes (Source: NCERT). This digital divide and disruption is causing a nationwide increase in learning deficiencies amongst students, leading to an extensive learning gap.

Together, let’s make an effort to bridge the gap between Pia and her education and donate a laptop/smartphone. Join the Digital Daan Campaign today!

Come, join hands with us as we help you make a difference in the progress and development of this generation.

Donation page: https://www.digitaldaana.org/ (Currently for Indian donors only)

Written by: Shreya Roy

Metta Social solutions Pvt Ltd

Follow us on Social Media:

Digital Daana: https://linktr.ee/DigitalDaana

Metta Social: https://linktr.ee/MettaSocial


Digital Daana was originally published in Metta Social on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Social media marketing for Special purpose organisations by Vernon Fernandes

Photo by Merakist on Unsplash

“Our world is accessible on one single device now. Currently people are attending office meetings through a mobile, children are attending school on a mobile, we are watching movies on the mobile. Well,now we are even practicing social distancing on the same mobile”

Today Social Media such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, have become primary sources of information. With the advent of such platforms in the 21st century, we are not only learning the latest news but also using these vehicles to provide personal and business updates. Now with rapid technological advancements, special purpose organizations with social media channels can easily connect with their target audience and even add a personal touch in their messaging which can be sometimes difficult to deliver through letters and emails.

For Businesses and NGOs, this means leveraging social media to support employees, customers, fundraisers and other stakeholders. The world has become a very small place to live now. We can connect with anyone at any point of the world. Where does your organization stand in this domain? Is your organization using social media? Are you telling the right story online? Let’s answer these questions step by step.

Giving The Right Picture To The Right Audience

Social Media Marketing can help nonprofits narrate their story in a compelling and effective way. It can build awareness for their cause. It helps the world understand what drives their enterprise. This will gain empathy and support for their work, and also help them raise funds with the right communications.

“Charity for water” is an NGO that has been successful in achieving all of this through their social media presence. They have raised almost $370 million dollars since 2006 by simple branding in such a way that people notice. Branding brings money. Even though their designs are basic, but most importantly they have a compelling story to tell. Also, the NGO has used various media vehicles such as television, online marketing, event, fundraising networks etc. so that they attract all kinds of audience.

Let’s talk about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Even though a lot of people were not aware of the purpose behind the challenge, it helped generate over $100 million and grabbed attention from all over the world. This is the power of social media. It creates a ripple effect, and creates a mass appeal.

Where Do We Begin ?

Begin by Setting your goals! Think about what you want to achieve and identify your challenges. But, remember to be practical with your goals. Definite goals and finding out means on how you can achieve them. Also, keep in mind that everything is not possible through mere online presence.

Identify your audience People’s decisions to donate are heavily swayed by how organizations engage with them online. It plates a pivotal role in their decision making. The target audience varies from cause to cause. The target audience of a healthcare NGO will be very different from that of an NGO dealing with education.

Telling the right story. This is one of the most ancient but potent marketing tools for any organization. The audience can be attracted by emotion, thought provoking journey though vivid images and powerful words.

“Organic social media marketing will increase donations. People will start investing in you. It’s highly economical and effective, if viral. Two- way communication is vital since that helps create effective campaigns”

The Building Blocks Of Social Media

The right website A responsive intuitive website with effective storytelling sets the foundation for the best way to garner support from across the internet. It should allow interactions and donations. The website should work on all devices, specially a mobile. A lot of organizations with requisite permissions can even collect donations via their website.

Facebook holds the global hotspot with over 2 billion users. This is the only social media platform used by people of all age groups- elderly, middle aged, young and even the retired. Each platform has its own essence and Vernon recommends that posting on Facebook should be 2–5 times a week.

Youtube is a great platform for creating emotive stories about various projects. The ideal age group to target via youtube is 19–49 years. This vehicle allows organizations to narrate their stories in a better way. The duration of a youtube video should be between 5–20 minutes.

Instagram as a social media platform is more young and vibrant. Dominantly the ideal age group to target via Instagram is under 35 years. Ideally, organizations should post daily on instagram to keep the audience hooked.

Twitter is used by a diverse audience of users from every age group predominantly 25–34 years. This platform is mainly for sharing meaningful updates and announcements. The messaging via twitter should be in a simple fashion with not much flowery language.

Hashtags help converge and connect ideas together and helps bring traffic of like minded donors to your causes quickly. Ideally it helps linking posts across all social media platforms. Also, specific hashtags for your campaigns helps aligning them together.

SEO Organic presence in your sector is very important. Using the right keywords in your website content is vital. Blogging is integral to all your work. Stories should be told in blog format. Local SEO is also necessary to help you get your immediate donors accessible.

Email marketing is the most cost effective channel. Building the right database and reaching out to tell them about your cause is essential. Right vocabulary as well as the right tone should be kept in mind while putting out a message. Try telling the right story with the right words and bring rhythm, rhyme and everything that you can move the recipients.

Storytelling content that works

Emotive images that can be used to narrate a story and hence, NGOs need to invest in photography and videography to bring out the best of their capabilities. Today, almost everyone has an internet connection. Video qualities are improving like ever before. People now prefer to watch videos than read blogs. Hence, documenting work and projects through images and videos is very important. NGOs need to invest in their staff. They are their backbone. The employees should feel at home and with the correct storytelling, even the audience wants to relate to them. Events and fundraisers help a lot. There are a lot of new innovative ways to connect with each other now.

In all it’s the correct engineering of the three Cs- Connect, convey and collaborate. These will help the organizations immensely on this journey of social media. You should always keep in mind that content on the internet is internal, therefore plan and access your content before posting.Social media is a great and a powerful medium to reach out to people, therefore it should be used with discretion and control to create a positive image for your work.

Written by: Yashu Saini


Social media marketing for Special purpose organisations by Vernon Fernandes was originally published in Metta Social on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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